New guidance on ‘fostering for adoption’

June 24, 2013 2 comments

family law

The British Association for Adoption and Fostering  (BAAF) has published new guidance on ‘fostering for adoption’ for local authorities. The guidance, commissioned by the Coram Children’s Legal Centre, sets out the key principles of this new government scheme, which allows people interested in adopting a child to foster them before the adoption is finalised. This…

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Chief social worker for children appointed

May 20, 2013 1 comment

family life

The first ever Chief Social Worker for Children and Families has been appointed by Education Secretary Michael Gove. Isabelle Trowler is a highly experienced social worker who “transformed” children’s services in Hackney, the Department for Education reports. In her new role she lead reforms which will affect the entire profession, the government says. In addition,…

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Government publishes ‘adoption passport’

May 5, 2013 0 comments

family life

A new ‘adoption passport’ published by the government aims to set out the full range of support available to people considering adopting a child. Support available includes leave from work for new adoptive parents, paid at rates similar to maternity and paternity leave. Adopters may also receive priority access to council housing and school places…

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Government launches adoption map

January 12, 2013 0 comments

family life

The Department for Education has published a map of England showing the number of children available for adoption in different areas of the country. Counties with more than 48 children available for adoption are marked in dark blue; those with 28-47 in dark green; and those with 18-27 in light green. Counties with 17 or…

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Government opts for shared parenting presumptions

November 7, 2012 38 comments

legal aid

In news which should be welcomed by family lawyers across the country, the government has announced that it plans to legislate for a legal presumption in favour of shared parenting. That would mean, in layman’s terms, that the involvement of both parents in a child’s upbringing would become the courts’ default position and they would need a specific and clear reason to exclude one of them, such as potential…

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