On the road again: divorce in the 21st century

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December 6, 2017 0 comments

family law

Financial Remedy Courts to be introduced These days I usually try not to fall for the hackneyed device of using song titles for titles of blog posts, but the old song by Canned Heat just didn’t leave my mind when I was considering the President’s circular on Financial Remedy Courts, that was published last Friday….

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President announces financial remedies courts

December 4, 2017 0 comments

family law

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service will begin trialling a new specialist financial remedies court next year, Sir James Munby has announced. In an official circular, the President of the Family Division said the case for a national network of such courts had been “persuasively argued” by legal authorities. He noted that he had himself…

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Edward VIII’s will ‘can be opened’ says President

November 17, 2017 0 comments

wills and probate

The envelope containing the will of late monarch Edward VIII can be unsealed, Family Division President Sir James Munby has ruled. Edward VIII was King of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth for less than a year before famously abdicating in December 1936. His desire to marry American divorcée Wallis Simpson was considered unacceptable according…

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Children in need, fraudulent petitions and more

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November 10, 2017 1 comment

family law

A week in family law The London Borough of Tower Hamlets has dismissed media concerns over their decision to place a child in the care of a Muslim foster family, following an investigation by a senior social worker from the council. The allegations, which were made in the national press, included that the child had…

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Sir James considers covert recordings

October 28, 2017 3 comments

family law

The Family Justice Council should examine the use of covert recordings in family cases, the President of the Family Court has declared. Sir James Munby said the use of covertly recorded conversations as evidence in cases was increasingly common and needed due consideration. The issue arose in a case concerning an 11 year-old girl, whose…

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