LASPO, reporting restrictions and more

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March 16, 2018 0 comments

family law

A WEEK IN FAMILY LAW The Government has finally launched its post-implementation review of the changes made to legal aid by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO). The aim of the review will be to assess the extent to which the objectives of the LASPO changes (as explained here) were…

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Government begins LASPO review

March 12, 2018 0 comments

legal aid

The government has launched its long-promised review of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012, commonly known as LASPO. First announced in January last year, the so-called Post-Implementation Review is intended to reflect the significant changes to both the legal system and society in general since LASPO first came into force on…

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A personal review of the year, part 3

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December 22, 2017 1 comment

family law

This concludes my personal review of 2017. (The first two parts, covering January to August, can be found here and here). September: disruptive In a sign both of the times and of the enormous responsibilities placed upon our family courts, a headline in The Telegraph on the 7 September read: “Returning jihadis will end up…

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It’s “not the right time” for a review of marriage law

October 27, 2017 2 comments

family law

Now is not the time to review marital law, the Justice Minister has insisted in a new letter to the Law Commission. In a belated response to a ‘scoping’ paper published by the Commission in December 2015, Dominic Raab acknowledges the Commission’s proposal to “review the law of marriage ceremonies in England and Wales”. Their…

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Care system linked to crime

October 23, 2017 5 comments

family life

Children who are exposed to the care system at a young age are more likely to become involved in crime as teenagers, government research has found. A new analysis by the Ministry of Justice cross-references youngsters who were the subject of welfare interventions by social workers while young with those whose names later ended up…

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More than a third of cases now unrepresented

October 1, 2017 2 comments

family law

No less than 36 per cent of all family court cases now feature unrepresented litigants on both sides, new figures from the Ministry of Justice reveal. A total of 13,029 new private law cases – i.e. disputes between individuals – were launched between April and June, three per cent more than in the same period…

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Maintenance variation, adultery and more

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August 18, 2017 0 comments

family law

A week in family law The proper approach to applications to vary maintenance orders is to be considered by the Supreme Court, in the case Mills v Mills. The facts of the case are that the parties were divorced in 2002. Their financial claims were settled by a consent order which, amongst other things, provided…

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