Falkland Islands now have marriage equality

family law

The government of the Falkland Islands has passed legislation legalising gay marriage.

The Legislative Assembly for this small British overseas territory approved the bill by seven votes in favour to just one against. Not only does the new law grant gay and lesbian couples full marriage rights, it also introduces civil partnerships. Unlike in England and Wales, such partnerships on the Falklands will be available to anyone, including straight couples.

This bill followed a public consultation taken on the islands in the South Atlantic Ocean, which have a population of around 3,000 people. The consultation revealed that an overwhelming majority – 90 per cent – of respondents were in favour of allowing same sex marriage. Eighty-seven per cent also said that churches should be allowed to perform gay weddings if they chose to do so.

The idea of civil partnerships for all couples was even more popular among those who responded to the consultation, with 94 per cent supporting its introduction.

Speaking to Pink News, a spokesperson for the Falklands said the new legislation “sends a clear and powerful message that all people and all relationships are equal” and its introduction “reflects the Falkland Islands’ tradition of being an open, tolerant and respectful community”.

Civil partnerships will be placed “on an equal footing with marriage” under the new law so couples “who wish to solidify their relationship with legal underpinning, but who do not wish to go down the traditional route of marriage” will not miss out on any rights, the spokesperson explained. Parental rights will be equal regardless of what kind of legal recognition a couple chooses. Sexual orientation will likewise be a non-factor, as “parents to a child may be two mothers or two fathers”.

The islands are planning to hold an event celebrating this step forward for gay rights later in the month. It will be the southernmost LGBT Pride event in the world.

Photo by Victor under a Creative Commons licence.

Stowe Family Law Web Team

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4 comments

Nemo Momenti - April 16, 2017 at 7:43am

They got to vote on it? The UK didn’t. So much for democracy.

Andrew - April 16, 2017 at 12:17pm

No – they got a consultation. The Legislative Assembly had the vote. It’s easier to get a useful result from a consultation when there are 3,000 people than when there are scores of millions.

Kevin Norman - April 17, 2017 at 6:31am

Hopefully the half-marriages approved here won’t be like the British ones. … where there is still pension discrimination.

Andrew - April 18, 2017 at 9:04am

There is nothing wrong with “discrimination” if there is a sound actuarial basis for it. I am a Bremainer but after Brexit I hope to see the end of the preposterous ruling that insurers cannot charge women, especially young women, less for motor and life insurance and cannot charge men less for annuities.

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