Successful city trader seeks to cut husband’s payout

divorce

A successful city trader has appealed after a family court awarded her ex-husband £2.7 million.

Maths graduate Julie Sharp, 44, made an estimated £6.9 million after a career successfully trading in the energy market, The Evening Standard reports. Specialising in coal trading, she and her IT consultant husband Robin lived a luxurious lifestyle with two expensive homes in Gloucestershire and an Aston Martin, but their relationship broke down after just four years, in September 2013. They never began a family.

She claims the award granted by the High Court is excessive and wants it reduced to under £1.2 million.

Their divorce came before High Court Judge Sir Peter Singer in November 2015. He ordered a clean break settlement for Mr Sharp of £2,737,000.

Mrs Sharp claims that this award was “intrinsically unfair”. Her barrister told the Court of Appeal in London:

“The notion that equal sharing applied in this case made for an unprincipled decision.”

He claimed that the couple had never mingled their finances and that Mr Sharp had repeatedly stressed during the marriage that “he did not see her as a sort of cash machine on whose financial resources he would have a call”.

Robin Sharp, meanwhile, says he contributed to the marriage by managing the couple’s two homes, the paper reports, even taking redundancy from his then job to devote himself to supervising the renovations on one property. This was agreed by Mrs Sharp he said.

His barrister declared that the settlement had been made in keeping with “the usual sharing approach to divorce”.

Court of Appeal judges reserved (postponed) their decision.

Image by GotCredit via Flickr under a Creative Commons licence

Stowe Family Law Web Team

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4 comments

Andrew - February 28, 2017 at 3:00pm

Interesting! If this was the other way round he would not have a snowball’s chance in hell of resisting the yardstick of equality in favour of her perceived needs. It’s cases like this which establish whether the law really is equal between the genders.

Alphonse - February 28, 2017 at 5:02pm

“It’s cases like this which establish whether the law really is equal between the genders.”

— Yeah, and so far, based on submissions, it clearly shows it is NOT.

It seems to me that, “What’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander”.

Though whether that eventually plays out in the courts is almost anyone’s guess.

K - March 5, 2017 at 11:51pm

PLEASE HELP, To make a long story short, About a week and a half ago My wife & i got into an argument, It happens, Anyways there was no physical contact AT ALL, Other than me tossing a tiny lamp Into trash, She yelled Fu. So I yelled it back, she proceeded out of bedroom and spent the night on couch, I get up next morning she’s gone to work I Assume, Around 3pm 2 sheriffs deputies are headed down my driveway, (i lived way out in country) My doors wide open so im instantly worried somethings happened to her, They come to door serve me an EPO tell me grab up a few things i have to get out, Keep in mind she is on verge of getting massive settlement, I go to court about week later, EPO dropped, Turned into 1 YEAR DVO, I do get to tell judge what happened, But i might as well been mute, She apparently somehow snuck and had my truck put in her son’s name, Oh i did tell judge, Hey she can have her settlement, Give me my belongings, And my truck, She can have it, Apparently that’s not good enough for her, She had her son sneek and get a loan on my truck, EVEN THEN I bit my tongue and said fuck it, Give me my truck and personal belongings, I will pay loan off, Her lawyer told me she agreed, That was 5 days ago, Ive heard nothing. ANY ADVICE.

Andrew - March 6, 2017 at 6:15pm

K: this blog is run by a firm of lawyers in England, and I am guessing you are not from there. You need advice from a lawyer in your own State.

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