Most councils don’t know how much child neglect takes place

children

The majority of local authorities do not how much child neglect takes place in their regions, a charity has claimed.

Data received after a Freedom of Information request made by the charity Action for Children suggests that as many as 60 per cent of local authorities across England do not have any systems in place to monitor early signs of child neglect in their areas. Such councils only collect data relating to children who have already been referred to social services.

Action of Children chief executive Tony Hawkhead described the figure as a “tragedy”, which “needlessly” put the lives of vulnerable children “at further risk”.

He added:

“This is unacceptable when we know more can be done – we cannot allow the suffering of any child. Neglect can be stopped in its tracks.”

Families with problems can be transformed with early assistance, he claimed, and helped to make positive changes so they become “the best parents they can be”.

In March, Action for Children endorsed a call for children to have more say in the selection of care home staff.

Photo by drpavloff via Flickr

 

Stowe Family Law Web Team

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2 comments

Andrew - August 21, 2014 at 5:51pm

“Data received after a Freedom of Information request made by the charity Action for Children suggests that as many as 60 per cent of local authorities across England do not have any systems in place to monitor early signs of child neglect in their areas. Such councils only collect data relating to children who have already been referred to social services.”

I should bloody well hope so too. It’s not the job of LAs to snoop around looking for symptoms of child neglect. Telescreens, anyone?

David mortimer - August 21, 2014 at 9:52pm

Please will you kindly confirm that you are aware there is no specific legislation or regulations which require local authorities to collect & hold information on child abuse perpetrators or for them to use that information to formulate evidence based child protection policies?

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